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In a Rut? The 10 Best Things To Do

Overcoming Depression

This can be one tough time of the year. The holidays are behind us and we’re smack-dab in the middle of winter. No doubt, it’s prime time for getting into a rut.

The things we used to enjoy just don’t cut it anymore. Any form of person-to-person contact? Ehhh. Appetite? It’s either zippo or the entire kitchen. And sleep? It’s all over the board.

We’re irritable as heck and often can’t sit still. Yet we’re more than willing to be a couch potato. That drink, cigarette, or hit on the pipe is making us feel awfully good. And concentration? No way. To the extreme, we may feel as though we just don’t want to be on planet earth.

Oh yeah – we’re in a rut.

But let’s feel and think about it. Is being in a rut such a far-fetched morsel of reality just now? I sure don’t think so. And coming to really understand that opens the door to freedom and relief.

So let’s cut right to the chase. How ’bout some very relevant and meaningful suggestions.

The 10 Best Things to Do When We’re In a Rut

  1. Take the time to connect-the-dots, and embrace the legitimate reasons for our misery. This allows us to sidestep misinterpretation and misreaction (made that word up).
  2. Learn to second-guess our feeling, thinking, and behavioral instincts in the midst of our rutness (made that one up too). When in doubt, feel, think, and do the opposite.
  3. Alter our routines – meal times, our way to work or school, how we handle our work at home, and more.
  4. Share our feelings and thoughts with someone we trust (even though we really don’t want to mess with humans).
  5. Force ourselves to get into motion – workout, take a drive (even if there’s no place to go), walk, dance around the house, catch a flick.
  6. Wear nicer clothing than we might ordinarily for the day or an event.
  7. Get into music and literature.
  8. Double our antidepressants and benzos (kidding, kidding, kidding!).
  9. Flip through a photo album or videos of people we care about
  10. Don’t get in a rut in the first place. This is about coming to understand ourselves, and knowing our potential for unpleasant circumstances. Then it’s a matter of having Plans A, B, and C ready to go.

More Coping Techniques

Here are four fairly recent chipur articles that provide great anti-rut resource info…

Desperate Times? 10 “Undesperate” Measures

Tai chi: Grace & Wellness (with video)

Art Therapy: 100 Exercises for Mind, Body, and Soul

“Teach me to be gentle with myself.”

The Facts

Together, let’s be realistic. Here it is, January 16. We’re coming off the holidays, we’re short on daylight and long on cold, we’re still reeling from the tragedy in Tucson, and crazy things are likely happening in each of our corners of the world

Would it be so out-of-hand to accept our rutness? Of course not. And in accepting it, we normalize it. Now, that doesn’t mean we aren’t trying to emerge. We are. But a sense of “What else would we expect?” helps us do just that by defusing misinterpretation and misreaction.

Getting into a rut is human, and we’re all prone to it. And, yes, it may be a bit easier to fall prey when we’re enduring a mood and/or anxiety disorder.

But the bottom-line is always – embracing the reality of our situation, connecting-the-dots as to why we’re there, avoiding misinterpretation and misreaction, and getting down to digging ourselves out.

Finally, it’s so important for us to come to know ourselves and our potential for not-so-pleasant circumstances. Only then can we anticipate trouble and head it off at the pass.

Rutness – yuckness – but we can overcome!

So what do you think, chipur readers? Who’s going to offer a comment or two regarding their personal state of rutness – or what they did about it?

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